By October 3: Last Chance to Participate in Survey about the Marketing of Training Programs, Products, and Services

Training and Development Colleagues.

If you have not yet participated, you can still participate in the Training magazine survey of the ways that training and development professionals promote their programs, services, and products.

Our survey is open until October 3, 2017.

The results provide practical insights for internal and external training professionals who want to effective promote their programs, products, and services.

So whether you work internally or externally, if you are interested in participating in the study, please visit this link before the survey closes:

https://survey.concordia.ca/limesurvey/index.php/838924?lang=en

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By October 3. Participate in Survey about Marketing Practices in Training

Training and Development Colleagues.

Last week, you might have noticed my invitation to participate in Training Magazine’s survey of the ways that training and development professionals working both internally and externally promote their programs, services, and products.

The results provide practical insights for internal and external training professionals who want to effective promote their programs, products, and services.

Whether you work internally or externally, if you are interested in participating in the study, please visit this link:

https://survey.concordia.ca/limesurvey/index.php/838924?lang=en

The survey will remain open through October 3, 2017.

I hope that you will visit the link and participate in this survey.

By October 3: Participate in Survey of Marketing Practices in Training

Training and Development Colleagues.

Whether you work internally or externally, promoting the programs, services, and products prepared by your organization plays a role in its success.

But how do training and development professionals actually promote—or market—their programs, products, and services? Do they still publish catalogs and schedules? What role does social media play? How about personal contacts and relationships?

Because no one has studied this issue since the 1990s (that is, a time before email), Training Magazine is conducting a study. We seek participation from all training and development professionals—whether you work internally or externally, as people working in both situations have to make others aware of their offerings.

If you are interested in participating in the study, please visit this link:

https://survey.concordia.ca/limesurvey/index.php/838924?lang=en

The survey will remain open through October 3, 2017.

I hope that you will visit the link and participate in this survey.

Suggested Textbooks for Instructional Design and Technical Communication Courses

(In case you missed the suggestions offered earlier in the summer.)

Are you teaching one of the following courses in the coming academic year:

  • Instructional design?
  • Advanced instructional design?
  • e-learning?
  • Informal learning and noninstructional interventions?
  • Management of instructional design or technical communication groups?

Then consider using one of the following texts for your course:

Course Suggested Text
Instructional design? Training Design Basics (2nd edition). Alexandria, VA: ATD Press.

The book will be hot-off-the-presses (August publication) and offers a number of related instructional resources online.

Advanced instructional design? Advanced Web-Based Training. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

This book explores a variety of advanced topics and tactics that help budding instructional designers prepare effective programs, including instructional philosophies, blended learning, online mentoring, the live virtual classroom, and communicating visually.

e-learning? The e-Learning Handbook. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

This award-winning book provides a number of readings intended to spark critical thinking about e-learning, covering everything from social learning and learning strategies, to the chasm between the promises and realities of e-learning in the academy and industry.

Informal learning and noninstructional interventions? Informal Learning Basics. Alexandria, VA: ATD Press.

This award-winning book introduces informal learning within the context of the workplace, proposes a viable model of its application for both the transfer of formal training and self-directed professional development, and explores a variety of ways to create and evaluate informal learning experiences.

Management of instructional design or technical communication groups The Commerce of Content website (http://commerceofcontent.wordpress.com), which provides a primer on basic project management, basic people management, and basic business management issues, as well as related worksheets and forms, and readings to help students deepen their knowledge of these issues.

For more information, please contact me.

Suggested Textbooks for Instructional Design and Technical Communication Courses

Are you teaching one of the following courses in the coming academic year:

  • Instructional design?
  • Advanced instructional design?
  • e-learning?
  • Informal learning and noninstructional interventions?
  • Management of instructional design or technical communication groups?

Then consider using one of the following texts for your course:

Course Suggested Text
Instructional design? Training Design Basics (2nd edition). Alexandria, VA:ATD Press.The book will be hot-off-the-presses (August publication) and offers a number of related instructional resources online.
Advanced instructional design? Advanced Web-Based Training. San Francisco, CA:Pfeiffer.This book explores a variety of advanced topics and tactics that help budding instructional designers prepare effective programs, including instructional philosophies, blended learning, online mentoring, the live virtual classroom, and communicating visually.
e-learning? The e-Learning Handbook. San Francisco, CA:Pfeiffer.This award-winning book provides a number of readings intended to spark critical thinking about e-learning, covering everything from social learning and learning strategies, to the chasm between the promises and realities of e-learning in the academy and industry.
Informal learning and noninstructional interventions? Informal Learning Basics. Alexandria, VA:ATD Press.This award-winning book introduces informal learning within the context of the workplace, proposes a viable model of its application for both the transfer of formal training and self-directed professional development, and explores a variety of ways to create and evaluate informal learning experiences.
Management of instructional design or technical communication groups The Commerce of Content website (http://commerceofcontent.wordpress.com), which provides a primer on basic project management, basic people management, and basic business management issues, as well as related worksheets and forms, and readings to help students deepen their knowledge of these issues.

For more information, please contact me.

Visuals from 2016 ATD Presentation, Silver, Gold, and Bronze: How Much Effort Should You Really Invest in an ID Project?

About the session: Although many people blame the ADDIE instructional design process for the slow pace of instructional design (ID) projects, the real issue might be that people are investing more effort than a particular project is worth. Through a series of case activities, this session introduces a three-tiered approach to projects, suggests the level of effort appropriate to each type of project, and translates that into practical action—that is, adjusting the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation activities to the needs of the project, without sacrificing its quality. This session also provides an opportunity to apply the concepts to your current projects.

Application on the job:

  • Distinguish among different types of projects based on their scope and impact.
  • Describe the appropriate level of effort for different classes of instructional design projects.
  • Adjust analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation efforts to appropriate levels for a given project.
  • Determine how to adjust activities on a current work projects to match its intended scope and impact.

For a copy of the visuals: click here.

Concordia University professor Saul Carliner has been elected a Fellow of the Institute for Performance and Learning (formerly the Canadian Society for Training and Development)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Concordia University professor Saul Carliner has been elected a Fellow of the Institute for Performance and Learning (formerly the Canadian Society for Training and Development), the highest grade of membership in organization and honored at the organization’s annual banquet, November 19. The grade of Fellow provides peer recognition of members of the Institute who have made significant contributions to the field of training and development over a sustained period of time. Carliner is only the third person in the organization’s 50-year history to have received this honor.

At Concordia University, Carliner is an Associate Professor of Educational Technology, Provost’s Fellow for Digital Learning, Graduate Director of the PhD in Education, and serves on the Faculty Senate.  He has 218 publications, including 15 books and monographs–including the just-published Training Design Basics (2nd edition) and award-winning Informal Learning Basics—and 51 peer-reviewed articles. Carliner chairs the Certification Advisory Committee for the Institute and is a past board member. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication and Research Director for Lakewood Media, publisher of Training Magazine. Carliner is a member of the Provost’s Circle of Distinction and has received the Kenneth Rainey Award for Excellence in Research from the Society for Technical Communication (STC), Jay Gould Award for Excellence in Teaching from STC, and the Concordia Alumni Teaching Award. He is a past Research Fellow of the Association for Talent Development and a Fellow and past international president of the Society for Technical Communication.

The Institute for Performance and Learning is Canada’s only not-for-profit, member-based organization representing workforce professionals. For decades the organization has improved the lives and careers of hundreds of thousands of Canadians while helping Canadian organizations excel. The organization has chapters throughout Canada (including one in Montreal) and has the most successful credentialing program for training and development professionals in North America.

For more information,visit http://performanceandlearning.ca/volunteer-awards/